views from the gods

saints and sinners of the stage and screen

Whether you normally look down from the cheap seats in the gods, or sit up close in the front row, there's so much happening on the London performing arts scene and comedy circuit, it can be difficult to decide which shows you should spend your cash on and which shows should quite frankly, pay you for turning up.

At Views from the Gods, we review all the latest London talent, from West End plays to emerging comedians. We hope our site helps introduce you to some new performers.

Latest review:

I sit here at 5.30 in the morning, preparing for the day job, trying to remember when and how I became a real adult. To all intents and purposes it just happened around me and it's still in progress now, with old friends getting married, having children and moving out to the suburbs. Such is the premise of Joshua Salzman and Ryan Cunningham's Next Thing You Know, which brings us Waverly (Sarah Pavlovs), Lisa (Dru Stephenson), Luke (Alex McDonald-Smith) and Darren (Jack Scott-Walker), four young New Yorkers who struggle with the transition from carefree twenties to commitment-heavy, professional thirties. The concept crosses the pond easily, with nothing lost in translation for a young and similarly-disposed London audience.

Vocal talent in this production by Starbuck Theatre Company varies, though always supported dependably by Chris Corcoran on piano. Of the four performers, Pavlovs is the most effortless and solid vocalist, albeit one with a soothingly generic style. Stephenson takes the accolade for most striking voice, possessing as she does a certain power that singles her out, not to mention fits her character. Scott-Walker seemed overly restrained until roughly halfway in, but once in his stride the multi-genre singer that he is shone through. The combination is quite powerful, with the harmonies in both Hungover and a reprise of Next Thing You Know particularly effective.

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