views from the gods

saints and sinners of the stage and screen

Whether you normally look down from the cheap seats in the gods, or sit up close in the front row, there's so much happening on the London performing arts scene and comedy circuit, it can be difficult to decide which shows you should spend your cash on and which shows should quite frankly, pay you for turning up.

At Views from the Gods, we review all the latest London talent, from West End plays to emerging comedians. We hope our site helps introduce you to some new performers.

Latest review:

As someone who has spent the last few months hoping to win the lottery as a strategy for achieving early retirement and who has been unsurprisingly disappointed thus far, I freely admit even the best of us can make some appalling financial decisions from time to time. It's human nature to hope and that's what makes us all think we can be that one special person who magically beats the odds. In The Great Escapers, unemployed Roxie (Eloise Black) decides that digging a tunnel to liberate an ATM of its contents is a perfectly valid alternative to getting a National Minimum Wage job. After first enlisting her similarly jobless boyfriend Ryan (Josh Johnson) and career criminal friend Mickey (Tommy Burgess), one construction expert later and Roxie has got herself a merry band of would-be bandits.

Pitched as a 90-minute comedy, The Great Escapers runs noticeably over, and flits between light entertainment and drama. There are lots of interesting ideas and an equally large number of scene changes to accommodate them all. Burgess and Joe Murray's sound design to cover the transitions is at times remarkably spot on, with clever choices such as the Tesco Remix (This Can Now Be Placed In Your Bag). There are some other nice touches in Murray's direction. The use of simple wooden frames for example to fluidly represent anything from computers to windows works very well in the small space.

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